Don’t Forget

This message from Spurgeon landed hard. It is a powerful reminder for each of us.  Let me know if you enjoyed its teaching.  I would really like to hear from you. Blessings.

“This do in remembrance of Me.”—1 Corinthians 11:24.

T seems then, that Christians may forget Christ! There could be no need for this loving exhortation, if there were not a fearful supposition that our memories might prove treacherous. Nor is this a bare supposition: it is, alas! too well confirmed in our experience, not as a possibility, but as a lamentable fact. It appears almost impossible that those who have been redeemed by the blood of the dying Lamb, and loved with an everlasting love by the eternal Son of God, should forget that gracious Saviour; but, if startling to the ear, it is, alas! too apparent to the eye to allow us to deny the crime. Forget Him who never forgot us! Forget Him who poured His blood forth for our sins! Forget Him who loved us even to the death! Can it be possible? Yes, it is not only possible, but conscience confesses that it is too sadly a fault with all of us, that we suffer Him to be as a wayfaring man tarrying but for a night. He whom we should make the abiding tenant of our memories is but a visitor therein. The cross where one would think that memory would linger, and unmindfulness would be an unknown intruder, is desecrated by the feet of forgetfulness. Does not your conscience say that this is true? Do you not find yourselves forgetful of Jesus? Some creature steals away your heart, and you are unmindful of Him upon whom your affection ought to be set. Some earthly business engrosses your attention when you should fix your eye steadily upon the cross. It is the incessant turmoil of the world, the constant attraction of earthly things which takes away the soul from Christ. While memory too well preserves a poisonous weed, it suffereth the rose of Sharon to wither. Let us charge ourselves to bind a heavenly forget-me-not about our hearts for Jesus our Beloved, and, whatever else we let slip, let us hold fast to Him.

 

 

 

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A Loving Savior

Awaken by the Holy Spirit to share these meditations by C. H. Spurgeon with you.  I am on a course to move forward with more decisiveness and purpose when compelled by His Spirit. I am honored to be a very, very humble servant.  So in recognition of my position as a child of God, and understanding the need to be responsive and obedient I present their beautiful message (written in Old English).  I suspect someone, within this small circle of faith needs them as much as I did.  As you read them, and may His loving Spirit guide you today in all truth, justice, power and love.  Blessings.

He shall gather the lambs with His arm, and carry them in His bosom.”—Isaiah 40:11.

HO is He of whom such gracious words are spoken? He is THE GOOD SHEPHERD. Why doth He carry the lambs in His bosom? Because He hath a tender heart, and any weakness at once melts His heart. The sighs, the ignorance, the feebleness of the little ones of His flock draw forth His compassion. It is His office, as a faithful High Priest, to consider the weak. Besides, He purchased them with blood, they are His property: He must and will care for that which cost Him so dear. Then He is responsible for each lamb, bound by covenant engagements not to lose one. Moreover, they are all a part of His glory and reward.
But how may we understand the expression, “He will carry them”? Sometimes He carries them by not permitting them to endure much trial. Providence deals tenderly with them. Often they are “carried” by being filled with an unusual degree of love, so that they bear up and stand fast. Though their knowledge may not be deep, they have great sweetness in what they do know. Frequently He “carries” them by giving them a very simple faith, which takes the promise just as it stands, and believingly runs with every trouble straight to Jesus. The simplicity of their faith gives them an unusual degree of confidence, which carries them above the world.
“He carries the lambs in His bosom.” Here is boundless affection. Would He put them in His bosom if He did not love them much? Here is tender nearness: so near are they, that they could not possibly be nearer. Here is hallowed familiarity: there are precious love-passages between Christ and His weak ones. Here is perfect safety: in His bosom who can hurt them? They must hurt the Shepherd first. Here is perfect rest and sweetest comfort. Surely we are not sufficiently sensible of the infinite tenderness of Jesus!

“Joint heirs with Christ.”—Romans 8:17.

HE boundless realms of His Father’s universe are Christ’s by prescriptive right. As “heir of all things,” He is the sole proprietor of the vast creation of God, and He has admitted us to claim the whole as ours, by virtue of that deed of joint-heir-ship which the Lord hath ratified with His chosen people. The golden streets of paradise, the pearly gates, the river of life, the transcendent bliss, and the unutterable glory, are, by our blessed Lord, made over to us for our everlasting possession. All that He has He shares with His people. The crown royal He has placed upon the head of His Church, appointing her a kingdom, and calling her sons a royal priesthood, a generation of priests and kings. He uncrowned Himself that we might have a coronation of glory; He would not sit upon His own throne until He had procured a place upon it for all who overcome by His blood. Crown the head and the whole body shares the honour. Behold here the reward of every Christian conqueror! Christ’s throne, crown, sceptre, palace, treasure, robes, heritage, are yours. Far superior to the jealousy, selfishness, and greed, which admit of no participation of their advantages, Christ deems His happiness completed by His people sharing it. “The glory which thou gavest me have I given them.” “These things have I spoken unto you, that My joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full.” The smiles of His Father are all the sweeter to Him, because His people share them. The honours of His kingdom are more pleasing, because His people appear with Him in glory. More valuable to Him are His conquests, since they have taught His people to overcome. He delights in His throne, because on it there is a place for them. He rejoices in His royal robes, since over them His skirts are spread. He delights the more in His joy, because He calls them to enter into it.

Can You See Him?

“But their eyes were holden that they should not know Him.”—Luke 24:16.

HE disciples ought to have known Jesus, they had heard His voice so often, and gazed upon that marred face so frequently, that it is wonderful they did not discover Him. Yet is it not so with you also? You have not seen Jesus lately. You have been to His table, and you have not met Him there. You are in a dark trouble this evening, and though He plainly says, “It is I, be not afraid,” yet you cannot discern Him. Alas! our eyes are holden.

We know His voice; we have looked into His face; we have leaned our head upon His bosom, and yet, though Christ is very near us, we are saying “O that I knew where I might find Him!” We should know Jesus, for we have the Scriptures to reflect His image, and yet how possible it is for us to open that precious book and have no glimpse of the Well-beloved! Dear child of God, are you in that state?

Jesus feedeth among the lilies of the word, and you walk among those lilies, and yet you behold Him not. He is accustomed to walk through the glades of Scripture, and to commune with His people, as the Father did with Adam in the cool of the day, and yet you are in the garden of Scripture, but cannot see Him, though He is always there. And why do we not see Him?

It must be ascribed in our case, as in the disciples’, to unbelief. They evidently did not expect to see Jesus, and therefore they did not know Him. To a great extent in spiritual things we get what we expect of the Lord. Faith alone can bring us to see Jesus. Make it your prayer, “Lord, open Thou mine eyes, that I may see my Saviour present with me.” It is a blessed thing to want to see Him; but oh! it is better far to gaze upon Him.

To those who seek Him He is kind; but to those who find Him, beyond expression is He dear!

Our True Advocate

“If any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.”—1 John 2:1.

F any man sin, we have an advocate.” Yes, though we sin, we have Him still. John does not say, “If any man sin he has forfeited his advocate,” but “we have an advocate,” sinners though we are. All the sin that a believer ever did, or can be allowed to commit, cannot destroy his interest in the Lord Jesus Christ, as his advocate. The name here given to our Lord is suggestive. “Jesus.” Ah! then He is an advocate such as we need, for Jesus is the name of one whose business and delight it is to save. “They shall call His name Jesus, for He shall save His people from their sins.” His sweetest name implies His success. Next, it is “Jesus Christ”—Christos, the anointed. This shows His authority to plead.

The Christ has a right to plead, for He is the Father’s own appointed advocate and elected priest. If He were of our choosing He might fail, but if God hath laid help upon one that is mighty, we may safely lay our trouble where God has laid His help. He is Christ, and therefore authorized; He is Christ, and therefore qualified, for the anointing has fully fitted Him for His work. He can plead so as to move the heart of God and prevail. What words of tenderness, what sentences of persuasion will the anointed use when He stands up to plead for me! One more letter of His name remains, “Jesus Christ the righteous.”

This is not only His character BUT His plea. It is His character, and if the Righteous One be my advocate, then my cause is good, or He would not have espoused it. It is His plea, for He meets the charge of unrighteousness against me by the plea that He is righteous. He declares Himself my substitute and puts His obedience to my account. My soul, thou hast a friend well fitted to be thine advocate, He cannot but succeed; leave thyself entirely in His hands.  C. H. Spurgeon

Thank you Lord for being our advocate, our righteousness, our God and our Savior.

Jesus on the throne

This Man Receives Sinners

“This man receiveth sinners.”—Luke 15:2.

BSERVE the condescension of this fact. This Man, who towers above all other men, holy, harmless, undefiled, and separate from sinners—this Man receiveth sinners. This Man, who is no other than the eternal God, before whom angels veil their faces—this Man receiveth sinners. It needs an angel’s tongue to describe such a mighty stoop of love. That any of us should be willing to seek after the lost is nothing wonderful—they are of our own race; but that He, the offended God, against whom the transgression has been committed, should take upon Himself the form of a servant, and bear the sin of many, and should then be willing to receive the vilest of the vile, this is marvelous.
“This Man receiveth sinners”; not, however, that they may remain sinners, but He receives them that He may pardon their sins, justify their persons, cleanse their hearts by His purifying word, preserve their souls by the indwelling of the Holy Ghost, and enable them to serve Him, to show forth His praise, and to have communion with Him. Into His heart’s love He receives sinners, takes them from the dunghill, and wears them as jewels in His crown; plucks them as brands from the burning, and preserves them as costly monuments of His mercy. None are so precious in Jesus’ sight as the sinners for whom He died.

When Jesus receives sinners, He has not some out-of-doors reception place, no casual ward where He charitably entertains them as men do passing beggars, but He opens the golden gates of His royal heart, and receives the sinner right into Himself—yea, He admits the humble penitent into personal union and makes Him a member of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones. There was never such a reception as this! This fact is still most sure this evening, He is still receiving sinners: would to God sinners would receive Him.  C. H. Spurgeon

Jesus

What a mighty powerful word.  Our glorious, wonderful Lord.  We receives us.  Praise be to God.

Be Thou Clean

“I will; be thou clean.”—Mark 1:41.

RIMEVAL darkness heard the Almighty fiat, “light be,” and straightway light was, and the word of the Lord Jesus is equal in majesty to that ancient word of power. Redemption like Creation has its word of might. Jesus speaks and it is done. Leprosy yielded to no human remedies, but it fled at once at the Lord’s “I will.” The disease exhibited no hopeful signs or tokens of recovery, nature contributed nothing to its own healing, but the unaided word effected the entire work on the spot and for ever. The sinner is in a plight more miserable than the leper; let him imitate his example and go to Jesus, “beseeching Him and kneeling down to Him.” Let him exercise what little faith he has, even though it should go no further than “Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean”; and there need be no doubt as to the result of the application. Jesus heals all who come, and casts out none. In reading the narrative in which our morning’s text occurs, it is worthy of devout notice that Jesus touched the leper.healing-touch-of-jesus

This unclean person had broken through the regulations of the ceremonial law and pressed into the house, but Jesus so far from chiding him broke through the law Himself in order to meet him. He made an interchange with the leper, for while He cleansed him, He contracted by that touch a Levitical defilement. Even so Jesus Christ was made sin for us, although in Himself He knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him. O that poor sinners would go to Jesus, believing in the power of His blessed substitutionary work, and they would soon learn the power of His gracious touch. That hand which multiplied the loaves, which saved sinking Peter, which upholds afflicted saints, which crowns believers, that same hand will touch every seeking sinner, and in a moment make him clean. The love of Jesus is the source of salvation. He loves, He looks, He touches us, WE LIVE.   C.H. Spurgeon

Take Out The Trash

I’ve been reading through the Bible for the past few months, and I am always amazed by the majesty and the preciseness of our God.  The past two days, since the beginning of Holy Week, a persistence phrase keeps coming up – “Take out the Trash.”  It arose quite strongly yesterday during my meditation time, and again today while reading through the book of Numbers.  Now I know for some the OT can be a little confusing especially in Numbers and Leviticus, but this is where you see the majesty and precision of God.  Those wonderful details, if taken slowly and with reverence, can yield a mountain of revelation about our God.  What does this have to do with Take out the Trash?  Well in Numbers Chapter 4:1-49, God gives specific instructions to Moses and Aaron the priest on how to dissemble the Tabernacle, and whose is responsible for this enormous task.  There is a registration of men from the priestly tribe of Levi, those between the age of 30-50 years old who must prepare each sacred item for transporting during their wilderness journey. Meticulous planning and arrangements, even down to where these men are stationed within the camp were given by God to Moses and Aaron. Simply amazing.  And as I read this and reflected on the fact that this is Holy Week, I thought about how careless we’ve become during this sacred time leading up to Resurrection Sunday.  We go through the day not stopping to carefully arranged “sacred moments” for God, nor for ourselves.  Our Jewish brethren have begun Passover, where all “regular” activity has stopped, and story of the Exodus is told in great detail. This festival, commanded by God is a time of remembrance of about who they are and where they came from. It is shared, particularly with the young so they will know and understand their legacy and history, but more importantly how God brought them up out of bondage to freedom. There are preparations which included the purging and removal all food items containing “leaven” from their homes.  The house is cleared, and the “sacred” is highlighted, so mind and hearts can express appreciation to God for His gifts and blessings.

We, on the over hand spend nights watching “Scandal” or “Criminal Minds” filling our hearts and spirits with images designed to clog us with debris, and trash which robs us from experiencing God’s fullness.  The “sacred” is overshadowed by the fields of brokenness, pain, suffering, worry, pride, violence, envy, shame, guilt and the sin that so easily besets us.  Paul under the anointing of the Holy Spirit (1 Cor 3:16-17 NLT), stated “Don’t you realize that all of you together are the temple of God and that the Spirit of God lives in you? God will destroy anyone who destroys this temple. For God’s temple is holy, and YOU are that temple.”  We failed to recognize who we are and where we came from.  This important announcement is highlighted God’s word.  We, who profess the Lord Jesus Christ as our Savior have a duty; a sacred responsibility to maintain this temple(us) for God’s work.  It can’t and should not be littered with trash of this world.   He built us for greatness.  He created us in His image.  We are His workmen destined to show forth His majesty, dominion, power and love to the world.

Shouldn’t we consider how carefully we are approaching this sacred time?  Are we preparing our hearts and minds for His return?  Will Resurrection Sunday be just another date on the calendar, or will we show the world, by our example that we have taken out the trash?

Yes, there is much trash that needs to be removed, not just during Holy Week, but each and every day.  We must with intent and love, remove the build up of trash that has plugged, plagued and prevented our Holy Temples from being beacons of life, light and hope.  trash people 08

 

 

 

We need to stop feeding on the “dead carcasses” of the world, and prepare our Temples to transportation.  I guess that’s why the message of taking out the trash has been so pressing.  We all need to clear the way for Christ’s return, and prepare ourselves for his rightful position on the throne of our earthly temples.  Ready to take out the trash?  I hope so.  Let’s consider ways to consecrate this week to Him, and make His light shine.

Living Water

You may have heard about the chemical leak in West Virginia impacting 9 counties. As a result, those affected can’t bathe, drink, or even wash their clothes or dishes.  It has created a demand for clean water.  And although emergency resources are being mobilized, we don’t know how long it will take to rectify the situation.  So in the meantime, schools, restaurants, and some businesses are closed, and people are scrambling to find water.Picture2

My husband drove 25 miles to find bottled water the first evening of the disaster. As we were consuming our precious commodity, he noticed the label on one of the bottles.  It read...”Enon Springs…replenishes your body with the thing it needs the most, H20. Drink it straight up or on the rocks. Just drink as much as you can get your hands on because let’s face it, without water, you’re dust.”

How prophetic and so true.  Water is a precious resource that quenches and hydrates the body.  It cleanses us and our environment.  Water makes things grow and provides nourishment.  Water is life and we need it.  But we also need the living water of Christ. It helps us become like a tree planted by His water bearing fruit in due season. (Psalm 1:3 NLT paraphrased)  Drinking the living water Christ provides, we never go thirsty again.  For His blessed water is a fresh, bubbling spring giving us eternal life. (John 4:14 NLT paraphrased)

Without it, our leaves fall, our seeds don’t take root, our connection to the Living Vine is severed, and we become a valley of dry bones, animate objects of reproach, carcasses devoid of life. Oh, but the marvelous, living water of Christ heals, restores, empowers and makes ready the harvest.  So have a good, long drink of Christ’s living water. Get as much as you can each and every day.  Because without, it we are dust.

Count the Cost

Luke 14:28…”But don’t begin until you count the cost…(NLT)

The new year has officially begun and many have made resolutions, or set goals to change some aspect of their lives. For most it is the goal to be better, faster, stronger or just plain fit. Others vow to clean up and clear out their closets and become better organized. Some have plans to return to school, find a new job, write a book or begin a hobby, but whatever the goal there is a cost involved.  It is never easy.  One of the prime reasons so many of us fail to reach our goals is failure to calculate the costs. Jesus in this parable tells his disciples to calculate the cost of being a disciple before proclaiming their allegiance to Him.  Any person starting a building project must know how much it is going to costs.  The builder needs to know there is enough money and resources to complete the job.  Calculation is important with any project, even more so with being a disciple.

Disciples of Christ need calculate the costs involved in the purposes of God.  He tells us if we can’t give up self, family and follow Him, then we can’t be His disciple. The cost is too great. “Love for family and one’s own life must not compete with devotion to Christ.”  The risks are great, but the rewards are far greater. Christ counted the cost of leaving glory and coming to earth for us. The cost of temptation, pain, suffering and injustice to heal, save and deliver us.  And he has more than enough to pay the debt for our sins.

Thank you God for looking at the “love scale” and determining we were worth the costs.