I just wanted kids

I had a wonderful conversation with one of my aunts recently.  We talked about family, friends, current events; just things.  You get some much history when you stop and talk with your elders.  You get to learn about their lives, their likes, dislikes, and what made them who they are. During our 45 minute conversation, she shared that all she wanted was to be married and have kids.  “I just wanted kids, she said. I never wanted to work outside the home. It wasn’t for me. I wanted to support my husband and raise our children by staying home.”

As she continued, it was so clear. She wanted to raise bright, intelligent children, who would one day contribute to society and be a blessing.  There was so much strength in her voice. A strength I had never noticed before.  She would never write a sonnet, or perform in front of people, or create a masterpiece; her true mission was that of being a wife and mother.

Thanking God for this priceless moment, where I learned so much about my dear aunt, I also had a revelation; “aha” moment. I thought, Father God made a similar decision, when he decided to create us.  He just wanted to have kids; bright, intelligent, gifted, anointed images of himself all around the world. Children who would contribute, and be a blessing.

People spend years trying to find themselves, or their purpose. For some it only takes a moment, and their course is set.  No matter what lies ahead, they just know this is what they were meant to do.  God knew before eternity  was formed, that he would create us, and he did it knowing that his wayward children would fail, and yet here we are.  He just wanted to have kids.

You never know when, or where these moments of revelation will.  When they do, take a moment to soak them in.  They put life into perspective, these precious moments, or at least give us a chance to say “thank you.”

Longing for Purity of Heart

Here is an amazing quote from Prof. Ronda De Sola Chervin, from her book Prayers of the Women Mystics.

Longing for Purity of Heart”

“Such close union with God could not be without anguish because of the many imperfections of even a holy soul. But why should someone see seemingly small defects as offenses against God in the first place? We find a clue in our human loves. Don’t we feel worse when we display a weakness in front of someone we especially admire? How much more if the beloved one is hoping that his or her love would heal us of the insecurities revealed in sin. The offense comes when our behavior manifests the fact that some trifle is worth more to us than even love. Such defects include not only addictions of the flesh, but also those virtues themselves can becomes vices if worn with pride”.

Prof. Chervin wrote this in a chapter on St. Catherine of Genoa.  The comment that hit me the most was,  “The offense comes when our behavior manifests the fact that some trifle is worth more to us than even love”.  Some trifle; some insignificant thing which we hold onto for dear life, instead of letting it fall into the sea of love and forgiveness.  We, as a people are very good at holding onto the trifles of life.  We displayed them as ornaments for others to see. “So and so did this to me. Don’t you see it?”  Oh yes, we do.  We can’t help but see them, because we have some of our own trifles.  Trifles cling to us, and we cling to them.  We turned them into golden idols which drain away precious opportunities to dive deeply into the forgiving-truth; the healing truth; the saving truth of a love that is greater than anything.

Can’t we forgive as Christ did, and seek a purity of heart which does not remembers those trifles?

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Romans 8:35 KJV

Let no trifle, or anything else separate you from the love found in Christ.  Abandon the trifles beloved, and long for the purity of heart offered to us.

 

We Are Debtors

“Therefore, brethren, we are debtors.”—Romans 8:12.

S God’s creatures, we are all debtors to Him: to obey Him with all our body, and soul, and strength. Having broken His commandments, as we all have, we are debtors to His justice, and we owe to Him a vast amount which we are not able to pay. But of the Christian it can be said that he does not owe God’s justice anything, for Christ has paid the debt His people owed; for this reason the believer owes the more to love. I am a debtor to God’s grace and forgiving mercy; but I am no debtor to His justice, for He will never accuse me of a debt already paid. Christ said, “It is finished!” and by that He meant, that whatever His people owed was wiped away for ever from the book of remembrance. Christ, to the uttermost, has satisfied divine justice; the account is settled; the handwriting is nailed to the cross; the receipt is given, and we are debtors to God’s justice no longer. But then, because we are not debtors to our Lord in that sense, we become ten times more debtors to God than we should have been otherwise. Christian, pause and ponder for a moment. What a debtor thou art to divine sovereignty! How much thou owest to His disinterested love, for He gave His own Son that He might die for thee. Consider how much you owe to His forgiving grace, that after ten thousand affronts He loves you as infinitely as ever. Consider what you owe to His power; how He has raised you from your death in sin; how He has preserved your spiritual life; how He has kept you from falling; and how, though a thousand enemies have beset your path, you have been able to hold on your way. Consider what you owe to His immutability. Though you have changed a thousand times, He has not changed once. Thou art as deep in debt as thou canst be to every attribute of God. To God thou owest thyself, and all thou hast—yield thyself as a living sacrifice, it is but thy reasonable service.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon